High-altitude induced haemodynamic effects

The change in pressure of being in high-altitude has traditionally had a hypoxic effect. A study was done to look at the physiological effects of high elevation over a three-day period. The decrease in oxygen was found to lead to a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure that persisted from immediate exposure and continued over three days. See attached study. The altitude-induced haemodynamic changes on high-altitude UT pilots could also possibly be linked to the presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) or unspecified brain lesions.  See attached study.