Detecting Injuries on the field NFL style. You can do it too.

Here is a good example of how many people can be in the look out for injury. Weather it is by instant replay with high end technology or by simply asking family members, school’s assistants and volunteers to take a video of every game and share with the medical team. Any additional information such as mechanics of injury, especial circumstances and instant replay adds a lot of detail to an injury’s proper assessment. Should it be your son or daughter, wouldn’t you want the most information possible? Absolutely. Keep the cameras rolling and just like the NFL help your team.

 

Immune system compromised after a concussion: Pills may be in the making as a cure

The processes in which a brain deals with a concussion are many and therefore a variety of treatments are being formulated by many scientists currently involved in research. The latest research points to the immune system and is something to be concerned about, according to a new study published in the Journal Plos One, last week.

As reported by Popular Science, Sub-concussive jostling to the brain could lead to a series of events that ends with cells in the immune system attacking the brain, says Jeffrey Bazarian, a physician at the University of Rochester Medical Center and a co-author on a new study about brain injury as an autoimmune response.

Here is Bazarian and his colleagues’ idea. After a head hit, even if it doesn’t result in a concussion, the blood-brain barrier that separates the brain from the rest of the circulatory system opens up, releasing a brain protein called S100B into the blood. High levels of S100B in the blood are already known as marker for head injury; in Europe, emergency rooms give head injury patients S100B tests to decide whether they need a CAT scan.

We may be onto something here if further research efforts can shed additional light on this issue that may result in a possible pill or vaccine to block the Immune response. Furthermore, testing for S100B may be an ingenious idea for the pediatric population, if safe. It can be a useful measure to prevent unnecessary CAT scans known be harmful to the developing brain.

Here is the full study in PDF for additional information on Bazarian and colleague’s findings.